DiscoverMilwaukee2017 - page 72

M
ilwaukee is a county of extremes. It is one of the
state’s smallest counties geographically – and its most
populous. Its mood ranges from the hustle and bustle
of Milwaukee’s downtown to the rural quietness of River Hills,
Hales Corners and Franklin. There is the nightlife revelry along
Water and Brady streets and the quiet serenity of the 15,000-
acre Milwaukee County park system. There’s the majestic fury of
Lake Michigan on a blustery November day and the quiet gurgling
of the Kinnickinnic River. There are the stately lakefront mansions
along the county’s North Shore and the South Side’s modest bun-
galows. It is a county of cities and villages – from the sprawling
city of Milwaukee to the quiet village of Greendale, a “Greenbelt”
community designed and built around public parks. There really is
something for everyone in Milwaukee County. No matter where
you live in this dynamic county, you will never be far from the
action.
Milwaukee
Milwaukee is the hub of the metropolitan area. The 31st largest
city in the nation, it is known for its cleanliness, beauty and
diverse population. It is a community with a big-city soul and a
small-town heart. Milwaukee is both accessible and affordable.
Home prices have appreciated conservatively, avoiding the wild
swings that have plagued other housing markets. Because of
Milwaukee’s “melting pot” heritage, there is a variety of neighbor-
hoods from which to choose, each with its own distinctive flavor.
These quiet, residential neighborhoods are scattered throughout
the city, often distinguished by parks and small commercial dis-
tricts.
Downtown Living
Downtown Milwaukee is one of the
most exciting residential areas in the metropolitan area. The city’s
investment in an award-winning riverwalk along the Milwaukee
River, coupled with a growing demand for urban professionals to
be “near the action,” has spawned a multitude of upscale apart-
ment and condominium projects. These new homes are located
throughout the downtown area – in the city’s central business dis-
trict; just north of downtown in
Brewer’s Hill
, one of Milwaukee’s
oldest neighborhoods; in the
Park East
corridor; and in the trendy
Third Ward
and
Fifth Ward/Walker’s Point
just south of down-
town. Of these areas, the Third Ward is the most developed.
Located in a former warehouse district, its brick buildings have
become a magnet for boutique shops, unique eateries, profession-
al offices and condominiums.
The
East Side
is a densely settled neck of land squeezed
between the Milwaukee River and Lake Michigan. Its unofficial
boundaries run from the Milwaukee River east to Lake Michigan
and from the city limits south to Ogden Avenue. Though only one
mile wide and three miles long, it is crammed with dozens of
neighborhoods, scores of specialty stores and a population that is
extremely diverse. This is the “hip” side of Milwaukee, and it is as
exciting as it is complex. The more than 26,000 students who
attend the
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
keep the area
energized. Just west of the Milwaukee River is
Riverwest
, one of
the city’s most ethnically diverse neighborhoods, which is home to
a large artist population.
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Brown
Deer
River
Hills
Fox
Point
Glendale
Whitefish
Bay
Downtown
Milwaukee
Lake
Michigan
Bay View
West
Allis
West
Milwaukee
Greenfield
Hales
Corners
Greendale
Franklin
Oak Creek
South
Milwaukee
Cudahy
General
Mitchell
International
Airport
St. Francis
3 miles
N
Bayside
794
894
894
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43
Milwaukee
Shorewood
43
Wauwatosa
POPULATION:
949,795
COUNTY SEAT:
Milwaukee
MILWAUKEE
COUNTY
YOUR RELOCATION RESOURCE
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